Coastal Zone Management

M.S. in Coastal Zone Management

The Master's of Science in Coastal Zone Management is offered both in-house and by distance education (courses accessible via the world wide web). The online MS degree is designed for people "at a distance" from the Oceanographic Center, or those who wish to take advantage of the flexible delivery system. Students may complete the degree entirely online, or take a blend of distance and on-site courses (including field courses) with the Oceanographic Center.

The Coastal Zone Management degree program focuses on contemporary problems and conflicts arising from increased use of coastal areas and emphasizes the evaluation of alternative policy management solutions. It is intended for employees of government and industry seeking career enhancement, as well as for recent college graduates seeking careers in planning and management with government agencies, industries, and other activities depending on or affecting the coastal zone or its resources. The program can also be of value for enhancement of careers in education.

Learning Outcomes

Expected learning outcomes are:

Delivery System

On campus graduate classes typically meet one evening per week in a three hour session. Exceptions are field courses which may entail several days of intensive study. On-line courses meet periodically at the convenience of faculty and students  

Degree Tracts

There are two tracts for completing an M.S. degree.

Capstone

All entering M.S. students are accepted in the Capstone (also called Capstone track). Students take a minimum 13 regular courses in their selected degree for 39 credits.   Students must take Capstone Review Paper courses totaling a minimum of 6 credits (which involve submitting and defending a capstone review paper.  This is typically done at or near the completion of formal coursework.  The Capstone review paper is a scholarly review, based upon a comprehensive literature search, review, and synthesis of the chosen topic. Carrying out a Capstone review paper takes place with guidance from a major professor. Typically, Capstone students find a major professor by approaching faculty in the student's area of interest. Students will be assigned a Capstone advisor if they have difficulty in identifying a major professor. Prior to beginning a Capstone review paper and registering for Capstone Review Paper credits, the student must write a proposal which must be approved by the student's major professor, committee (define how committee is formed), and the Associate Dean of Academic Programs, and be submitted to the Director of Academic Support and Administration in the Program Office.

Thesis Optional Track

Some students desire the thesis track.  The thesis track requires an extra step.  A thesis is an original contribution to knowledge resulting from the systematic study of a significant problem or issue. A thesis track requires a minimum of 10 regular courses for 30 credits.  In addition, a minimum of 9 Thesis credits is required. To be allowed entry into the Thesis track the student must secure agreement from a faculty member to be the student's major professor. There must be adequate funding to carry out the proposed research.  Students are not provided with a thesis advisor. Prior to beginning thesis research and registering for thesis credits, the student must write a proposal which must be approved by the student's major professor, committee, and the the Associate Dean of Academic Programs, and be submitted to the Director of Academic Support and Administration in the Program Office. The Thesis option is typically a longer duration track and number of credit hours than the Capstone track.

For further details, students are referred to section 3.8 of this catalog and to the online guidelines for the capstone or thesis track found on the Oceanographic Center Student Information page

M.S. Credit Hour Requirements

The default Capstone track requires a minimum of 45 credits. This includes five 3-credit core classes, eight 3-credit specialty courses and a minimum of two 3-credit Capstone Review Paper courses (consisting of an extended literature review of an approved subject). Once a student starts registering for capstone course credits, they cannot stop registering for credits until the capstone is completed and defended. It is expected the Capstone review paper can be completed within two terms or less.  The completed Capstone review paper is presented in an open defense that includes the student's advisory committee.
The Thesis option track requires a minimum of 39 credits. This includes five 3-credit core classes, five 3-credit specialty courses, and at least nine credits of master's thesis research. The number of thesis research credits above the minimum is dependent upon the length of time needed to complete the thesis research, which may be more than the typical minimum three terms. The final thesis is formally defended in an open defense that includes the student's advisory committee.

Elective Courses

Students in a single degree are allowed to take up to two elective courses outside their degree orientation and have them count towards their final credit count.

For both the Capstone Review Paper and the Thesis degree tracks, once the proposal has been accepted, enrollment in the chosen track must continue until completion of the degree.

Joint M.S. Degrees

Also offered are Joint M.S. Degrees

The joint specialization M.S. degrees require a minimum of 57 course credits (19 courses) or 51 course credits (17 courses) (for Capstone review or Thesis respectively) including nine credits minimum thesis research or the six credits minimum for the capstone review paper. For the joint programs, students take approximately equal numbers of courses within each of the two specialties. The final thesis is formally defended in an open defense that includes the student's committee.

Core Courses

Course Numbers: OCOR-5603

Description

This is a basic course on the practical applications of descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis will be on the presentation of statistical theory, and the methodology of summarizing and analyzing biological data. It is designed for students who have never had a statistics course in college. (Students who have previously had statistics in college should plan on taking OCOR-5606: Biostatistics-II.) The use of software to facilitate computations will be presented. Specifically, statistical analysis utilizing Microsoft Excel® and PHStat2.5 for Excel® will be used in class. Measures of central tendency, dispersion, and variability testing will be discussed along with basic concepts of probability, continuous distributions, confidence intervals, one-sample and two-sample hypothesis testing.

Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  1. Develop an understanding of the foundations of statistical thinking and analysis.
  2. Master basic statistical methods necessary to analyze sample data and make inferences about the population of interest.
  3. Learn to use appropriate statistical software packages to conduct basic statistical analyses.
  4. Learn to interpret results of basic statistical analyses.

Course Numbers: OCOR-5606, BCOR-5575

Description

This is an intermediate/advanced course in the practical applications of descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on advanced methods of analyzing biological data. Topics will include: analysis of variance (ANOVA); data transformations; linear regression and correlation; power analysis; goodness-of-fit tests; and non-parametric methods. Additional topics may include multiple and curvilinear regression techniques. Handouts of the overheads will be generated each week to help minimize the amount of writing on the board and note taking.

Learning Outcomes

Students successfully completing OCOR-5605 (Marine Chemistry) are expected to:

  1. Further enhance the understanding of the foundations of statistical thinking and analysis.
  2. Use more advanced statistical methods to analyze sample data and make inferences about the population of interest.
  3. Increase the understanding of using appropriate statistical software packages to conduct statistical analyses.
  4. Learn to interpret results of more advanced statistical analyses.

Course Numbers: OCOR-5601

Description

This course covers basic ocean physics. Topics include: the physical properties of seawater, temperature and salinity structure of the oceans, major current patterns, waves and tides, influences of the wind, El Nino and tropical oceanography. The purpose of this course is to introduce marine science students to the spectrum of concepts of ocean physics and dynamics. It is a general course, intended for physicists as well as non-physicists. Through this course, students are expected to become familiar with the basic concepts of geostrophic balance, tracer advection, and wind-forcing of ocean currents. However, many topics are covered including: ocean surface waves, tsunami, planetary waves, Ekman balance, Sverdrup balance, Coriolis force, mixing, instrumentation, thermohaline circulation, and more.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students are expected to gain a basic level of comfort or familiarity with the basic terms and concepts of ocean physics and dynamics. Specifically, the terms geostrophy and Coriolis force, become familiar to, and have meaning for the students.
  2. Students are able to apply basic ideas of physical oceanography to their own specialization of marine science. For example, to understand the cycle of tides or the generation of surface waves when performing coral reef assessment dives.
  3. Students achieve an appreciation for the complications and unknowns of modern physical oceanographic research. A common example would be an appreciation for the fact that many details of regional ocean circulation and ocean state, such as SST cycle in Ft. Lauderdale harbor, are actually unknown.
  4. Students are introduced to the wide range of physical oceanographic topics and problems, and gain some appreciation of the progress in the field.

Course Numbers: OCOR-5608

Description

This course is intended to give students a view to how wind, radiation, gravity, friction, and the Earth's rotation determine the ocean's temperature and salinity patterns and currents. Some important process we will study include heat budget of the oceans, exchange of heat with the atmosphere and the role of the ocean in climate, surface mixed layer, waves in the ocean, geostrophy, Ekman transport, Rossby waves. Students will learn how to explain physical features of the ocean ranging from small-scale turbulence to global circulation.

Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  1. calculate Coriolis parameter, Ekman boundary layer depth, and Brunt-Vaisala frequency
  2. explain intensification of the western boundary current
  3. identify costal upwelling areas on satellite images of sea surface temperature and color
  4. Identify different water masses and their sources from global distributions of temperature and salinity
  5. interpret tidal sea level record
  6. write a report on a Physical Oceanography topic.

Course Numbers: OCOR-5605

Description

A study of the properties, composition, and origin of seawater; the importance, distribution, relationships, and cycling of the major inorganic nutrients, dissolved gases, trace metals, and organic compounds; and the use of radiotracers for water mass dating.

Learning Outcomes

Students successfully completing OCOR-5605 (Marine Chemistry) are expected to:

  1. Understand and apply the concepts of salinity and constancy of composition of the major seawater ions.
  2. Estimate the salinity of seawater by various physical and chemical methods.
  3. Compare and contrast the physical properties of seawater and fresh water.
  4. Determine dissolved oxygen concentrations in and rates of change in seawater, and properly evaluate the ecological meaning of the results.
  5. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the importance, major forms, distribution, measurement and cycling of inorganic forms of phosphate, nitrogen and silicate and trace elements in the sea.
  6. Understand, apply and interpret ratios of carbon, oxygen, phosphorus, nitrogen and silicate according to the Redfield ratios.
  7. Correctly determine the pH of seawater by electrochemical means, and interpret the meaning of pH fluctuations in biological or ecological terms.
  8. Calculate the concentrations and fluctuations of the major components of the CO2 system from pH/alkalinity data, and interpret the results in biological or ecological terms.
  9. Describe the general categories and importance of trace elements and dissolved organic matter and in the sea.

Course Numbers: OCOR-5602

Description

A study of the major plankton, nektonic, and benthic groups and associations, including their diversity, distribution, metabolism, production, trophic relationships, and ecological roles, with emphasis on coastal communities.

Learning Outcomes

Students will:

  1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of biological and ecological characteristics of the major groups of marine phytoplankton, and assessment methodologies.
  2. Demonstrate and apply knowledge of the biology and ecology of benthic marine plants and employ appropriate investigative methods.
  3. Apply knowledge of the functional aspects of photosynthesis and respiration to phytoplankton physiology and marine environmental assessment.
  4. Describe the roles and processes of bacteria in the marine environment.
  5. Describe the principal biological and ecological characteristics of the major groups of marine zooplankton and meroplanktonic larva.
  6. Describe biological and ecological characteristics of benthic animals, their ecological roles, feeding adaptations and growth rate determination.
  7. Understand and apply various models and associated statistics describing the growth of fishes.
  8. Understand the basic principles of fisheries management and discuss the associated problems and uncertainties.
  9. Compare and contrast the various reproductive modes and cost-benefit strategies of marine organisms and relate this to dispersal and larval strategies.
  10. Understand, compare and contrast functional aspects of food webs of major marine ecosystems, and interpret energy flow diagrams.
  11. Appreciate the strengths and limitations of ecosystem models.
  12. Demonstrate knowledge of the basics of population ecology and employ associated laboratory, field or statistical methods

Course Numbers: OCOR-5604

Description

A general overview of concepts of marine geology and the evolution of the oceans. Key concepts of plate tectonics, stratigraphy and historical geology form a framework for a holistic view of the ocean basins. This course serves as an entry to more advanced and specialized topics in marine sedimentology as taught at NSU.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will have a clear overview of how ocean basins form and change in time.
  2. They will understand the dynamics of the earth's crust and its importance for geomorphology and evolution.

* Either Biostatistics I or II will fulfill theBiostatistics core requirement.
+ Either Concepts of Physical Oceanography or Introduction to PhysicalOceanography will fulfill the Physical Oceanography core requirement

Coastal Zone Management Courses

Course Numbers: CZMT-0960, OCMB-9800, MEVS 5400

Description

Archaeological Oceanography: Reefs and Wrecks will examine human interest in the tension of natural and cultural treasures. Students explore the dynamics of ocean systems, human systems, natural and artificial reefs. Legal, ethical and preservation considerations will be examined. Mapping, navigation through time and tools and technology through time will be featured as well as present day conservation of artifacts, archives and the nature of evidence. A self-selected student project will be a requirement. For the Oceanography major, the student project will focus on ocean science and/or engineering. For the Coastal Zone Management major, Certificate Program or Education Degree student, the focus for the student project can be from a broad range of relevant topics.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0955

Description

Archaeological Oceanography: Reefs and Wrecks will examine human interest in the tension of natural and cultural treasures. Students explore the dynamics of ocean systems, human systems, natural and artificial reefs. Legal, ethical and preservation considerations will be examined. Mapping, navigation through time and tools and technology through time will be featured as well as present day conservation of artifacts, archives and the nature of evidence. A self-selected student project will be a requirement. For the Oceanography major, the student project will focus on ocean science and/or engineering. For the Coastal Zone Management major, Certificate Program or Education Degree student, the focus for the student project can be from a broad range of relevant topics.

Learning Outcomes

  1. To become knowledgeable about and appreciate both natural and cultural treasures and the interplay between them.
  2. To understand the complexity of the tensions (legal, ethical, environmental and preservation considerations) and prepare to undertake appropriate actions based on the short-term and long-term.
  3. To become wise about the history of mapping, navigation, ship design and the tools and technologies of exploration and the nature of evidence.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0957

Description

Stable isotope ratios provide a natural way to follow and trace elemental cycling in a number of environments. This course will focus on the use CHNOS isotope distribution and cycling in different biomes. The information provided will cover migration and invasion, food webs, mixing, plants, animals, microbes, atmospheric gases; and the focus of the course will be more closely tailored to the needs of students. Students will process a limited number of individual project samples and learn to interpret the stable isotope data. Course evaluation will be based on participation, a project report and a research paper on the use and evolution of stable isotopes in an area of environmental science. This distance learning and field-based course will examine human interest in the tension of natural and cultural treasures. Students will experience the dynamics of ocean systems and human systems, as well as natural and artificial reefs, within the context of legal, ethical and preservation considerations. Present day conservation of artifacts, archives and the nature of evidence will be highlighted.

The distance learning portion of the course will be for delivery of on-line learning materials as well as dialogue with students/faculty prior to the field-based component and afterwards. The proposed field experiences will be based at Fort Jefferson, Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida; a snorkel trip to natural and artificial reefs near Key West; and a snorkel trip to various shipwrecks of the 1733 fleet near Islamorada. (For background, please see: http://www.flheritage.com/archaeology/underwater/galleontrail/).  The participants will have several experiences that will be required and will be offered to all students at the same time in the same place. For these, a field/lab fee will be charged. Other experiences will be recommended that have quality interpretation on site. Students can stop by these locations and partake of the experience independently. There will be weekly assignments and postings to the Bulletin Board (group). A reflective essay (individual) will be required of each student at the end of the term.

Learning Outcomes

  1. To gain knowledge and appreciate both natural and cultural treasures and the interplay between them.
  2. To understand the complexity of the tensions (legal, ethical, environmental, and preservation considerations) and prepare to undertake appropriate actions based on the short-term and long-term.
  3. To become wise about the history of mapping, navigation, ship design and construction, and the tools and technologies of exploration and the nature of evidence.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0790, MEVS-5100

Description

This course deals with various forms of environmental pollution as they affect both the land and maritime environment. Focus on the role of microorganisms as causes and indicators of toxicity. Sources, measurement, and control of pollution in marine and coastal environments are discussed.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Understanding the nature of pollution and its possible sources.
  2. Become familiar with analytical techniques and interpretation of results.
  3. Understand the use of fecal pollution indicators.
  4. Recognizing the complex nature of Harmful Algal Blooms.
  5. Students will have exposure to learn about local environmental agencies and their ongoing monitoring programs.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0671, OCMB-6215

Description

Sharks and rays (collectively termed "elasmobranchs") are creatures of biological elegance and perennial fascination. In recent years, new technologies have revealed fascinating details about the heretofore secret lives of elasmobranchs as well as demonstrated their population declines on an unprecedented and global scale. This unique 12-week course is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary introduction to the evolution, biology, ecology, and conservation of elasmobranch fishes.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Integrate scientific learning from basic biology, physics, and chemistry, and elasmobranchs biology
  2. The student will have well-rounded, and up-to-date understanding of the biology of elasmobranch fishes,
  3. The student will have requisite knowledge necessary for the pursuit of careers in marine ecology, zoology, ichthyology, and fisheries management.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0673, OCMB-6250

Description

In this course we will survey the evolution and diversity of past and present sharks and rays and also examine distributions, environments inhabited, ecological roles, interactions within and among species, and review the life history characteristics of sharks and rays in relation to their occurrence and sustainability in fisheries with the overall goal of understanding the diversity of sharks and rays, their role in marine ecosystems and their interactions with humans (other than in terms of shark attack).

Learning Outcomes

  1. A well-rounded understanding of the general biology of sharks and rays, with a focus on their evolution, diversity, life history and ecology.
  2.  An appreciation for the diversity of sharks and rays in terms of the habitats they occupy, the roles that they play in marine ecosystems, their interactions within populations as well as with other organisms,  their role in fisheries and limits of their exploitation.
  3. Been better prepared for careers in marine ecology, zoology, ichthyology, and fisheries management.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0626, MEVS-5070, OCMB-6550

Description

The need exists to better understand the integrated biological-physical interactions in the marine ecosystem, particularly when studying the role of the oceans in climate change. This course is designed to study the impact of physical processes on marine ecology in small and large spatial scales. Emphasis is placed on the biology and how production at all trophic levels is impacted as a consequence of the physical environment.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The student will learn how the physical aspects of the ocean impacts the biological processes.
  2. The student will learn out to evaluate how the physical environments impacts biological samples.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0790

Description

Course description: High latitudes are undergoing rapid and significant change associated with climate warming.  Climatic changes in these regions interact with and affect the rate of the global change through atmospheric circulation, biogeophysical, and biogeochemical feedbacks. Changes in environmental conditions are often first exhibited in high latitudes and more sensitive to fluctuations. This course will explore the impacts of current and projected long-term environmental changes in both the northern and southern hemispheres bodies of water. Primary literature will be read and discussed covering a range of topics from the physical, chemical and biological perspectives as well as predictive models. Web sites and links of organizations and agencies studying high latitudes will be provided. Students will be responsible for active discussions weekly online and a term paper discussing a chosen topic related to high latitude environmental change.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify oceanographic environments in both the northern and southern hemisphere.
  2. Recognize what constitutes a significant change in the physical and chemical environment as well as learn what biological organisms can be used as indicator species of change.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0677

Description

The recent Deep Water Horizon oil spill, which occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, was the largest accidental marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. The explosion killed 11 platform workers and injured 17 others.  In addition, the spill has caused extensive damage to marine and wildlife habitats as well as the Gulf's fishing and tourism industries. This course will examine disciplines, authorities, and policies involved in the field of maritime emergency management. Topics include: hazard analysis and underlying social and environmental processes, disaster risk reduction and human health resilience, vulnerability analysis, hazard mitigation, emergency response, and disaster recovery.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates will be able to describe, identify, and apply knowledge and procedures pertinent to mitigation/prevention, preparation, response and recovery from incidents, hazards and emergencies in the maritime environment.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0612

Description

Students will have the opportunity to develop their overall and general knowledge of coastal policy issues, problems, the politics of coastal policy, and some of the proposed solutions to coastal issues.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students who complete this course will have an overview of the major elements of coastal behavior (i.e. how do coast lines "live" and what is the dynamic of the coast), understand the impact of scientific research on coastal policy, be knowledgeable about selected US case studies of coastal environments and the challenges they pose, and have a basic grasp of US Ocean/Coastal policy, laws, and major initiatives.
  2. Students will be guided to examining, in a short research project, a detailed topic on coastal policy of special professional or academic interest to them. This will normally be a review of the literature and recommendations for future research. They will become familiar with literature review and graduate student writing techniques and expectations.
  3. This class encourages students to gain experience in discussing, in a serious and respectful way, selected topics related to coastal policy and they will learn how to effectively share their personal and professional experiences and opinions on these subjects. 
  4. Students completing this class will be more professional and informed in their workplace and academic environment and will be better able to contribute to the public agenda and debate on problems of US coastal areas.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0667

Description

This is a web-based course that offers an exploration of communication and experiential learning theories and their application to the interpretation of coastal zone environments.  This course provides the student with learning opportunities that will require them to, "go outside, sniff around," explore the coastal zone and thereby be engaged in hands-on interpretive experiences.  These will include: the design and writing of an interpretive guide for a coastal or underwater trail, design and writing of interpretive signage for a coastal site and the planning, research and presentation of an interpretive program. Students will investigate the wide range of media available, including video, interactive web sites, written media, and verbal communications as they implement their interpretive activities. These experiential learning opportunities will form the basis for reflective observation, self-evaluation, and participant feedback.  In addition to gaining a solid understanding of interpretive theory, students will also develop their own interpretive concepts and theories appropriate to their particular location and needs.  As the course progresses the students' on-going knowledge of coastal zone interpretation will be applied specifically to the in-course interpretive program that they will be planning, researching and presenting.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will:

  1. be familiar with communication and experiential learning theories
  2. understand how these theories apply to nature interpretation and environmental education program design
  3. have experience in developing theory-based interpretive learning materials

Course Numbers: CZMT-0655

Description

This course assumes that you have an interest in Remote Sensing and large-scale Earth observation. It is not intended to matter whether you consider yourself a chemist, physicist, biologist, geologist or geographer. The intention is to present Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) as a tool for studying the Earth and its processes. The course is designed to be accessible to anyone with a reasonable grounding in the Earth Sciences and is tuned to give a general introduction to a wide scope of relevant topics. Nonetheless, you must be prepared to grapple with some basic ideas of Physics. The syllabus introduces electromagnetic radiation principles in the context of Earth observation and presents an overview of the current status of both active and passive air- and space-borne RS systems. Having followed a typical processing-stream required to extract quantitative information from satellite imagery, you will be introduced to the field of GIS through specific environmental case-studies. Image calibration, geo-rectification and classification are dealt with by providing a grounding in the theory underlying image processing. Remote Sensing is not about interesting pictures of the Earth's surface, although there are some spectacular images to be discovered. It is really about careful, precise measurements of surface parameters, including the techniques and methodology, the scientific principles behind the techniques and the 'real-world' application of the technology.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The students will be taught the fundamentals of GIS, its potential as well as its limitations. Remote sensing is presented as an integral part of the GIS hierarchy and introduced using both marine and terrestrial examples.
  2.  Through the course the student will be instilled with a broad and comprehensive understanding of remote Earth-observation, and will become familiar with the suite of sensors currently used for routine environmental monitoring.
  3. Through tailored lab-exercises, each student will have ample opportunity to conduct case studies to answer specific environmental questions. The case studies cover a complete processing stream, from image acquisition, preprocessing, processing and finally, critical evaluation of the utility of the final map product. This experience will allow students to take what they have learnt from the course and apply GIS and spatial-analysis to their own projects.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0699

Description

The emphasis is on the coastal zone manager's understanding of pollution sources, relative risk and potential effects on human and marine life. Sources, measurement, and control of pollution in marine and coastal environments are discussed.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Basics of risk assessment
  2. Risk characterization
  3. Relative risk and potential effects of toxicity on human and marine life

Course Numbers: CZMT-0665

Description

This web-based distance education course highlights more than three decades of international discussion, debate and ideas with regard to the state of the environment and our actions towards it.  The course begins with the 1972 UN Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm, 1972) and continues to the present day. Key considerations and voices are included, from both North and South. The course examines in a cross-cutting approach the environmental and social issues that effect our lives, with an emphasis on international perspectives.  Students become part of a "place-based learning community", by participating in on-line closed discussion. The emphasis is on presenting an international range of perspectives and case studies, linking their historical development with current occurrences.

Learning Outcomes

  1. About the key concepts, controversies and conferences that have predominated in international environmental management over the past three decades.
  2. To consider and discuss some of the different and sometimes conflicting ways in which people from different socio-economic, cultural and political perspectives in the global North and South have viewed and continue to view these issues.
  3. To formulate a view of how these issues may relate to their own place and situation, against an international backdrop.
  4. To communicate effectively in asynchronous closed online discussion with a diverse community of their peers regarding these key debates and issues.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0806, OCMB-9545 (different course title)

Description

This is a basic course on the fate of chemicals and their biological effects on aquatic organisms. It presents the history of aquatic toxicology and the general mechanisms of transport and transformation of chemicals in water/sediment systems and within aquatic organisms. Also, it examines basic aquatic toxicological concepts and principles, concentration response relationship, criteria and approaches to single-species laboratory tests and multispecies field studies, the importance of good laboratory practices, and considerations for analyzing and interpreting aquatic toxicity data. Special types of organismal and media tests are discussed in addition to topics on biomarkers and biomonitoring, mathematical modeling, structure activity relationships, and aquatic risk assessment.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will have a clear understanding of:

  1. The nature of toxic effects and possible sources.
  2.  Analytical methods for estimating toxicity.
  3. Relative risk and potential effects of toxicity on human and marine life.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0639, BMME-6000, MEVS-5023, OCMB-6100

Description

This course provides hands-on training with the latest techniques in geographic information systems and remote sensing. Course work includes lecture and hands on computer training. Areas covered (utilizing both ERDAS Imagine 8.3 and ESRI Arcview 3.0) include: GIS/remote sensing theory, image georeferencing and mosiacking, image enhancement and classification procedures, accuracy assessment procedures, importing GPS polygons, establishing database and multimedia hotlinks, importing tables, joining building queries, charting and map creation. Instruction will be centered on application of these techniques to actual environmental case studies.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The students will be taught the fundamentals of GIS, its potential as well as its limitations. Remote sensing is presented as an integral part of the GIS hierarchy and introduced using both marine and terrestrial examples.
  2. Through the course, the student will be installed with a broad and comprehensive understanding of remote Earth-observation, and will become familiar with the suite of sensors currently used for routine environmental monitoring.
  3. Participants will be directed towards recent literature in a variety of current topics so as to ensure that by the end of the course, all students will be aware of the current status of remote sensing and GIS technology.
  4. Not only will students be familiar with the many types of remote sensing imagery used for Earth observation, they will also have a grounding in the physics behind the imagery, so as to allow a critical evaluation of the technology as a real-world tool.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0614

Description

This web-based distance education course focuses on the international dimensions of integrated coastal zone management. Students will first examine the major "big picture" issues affecting the world's coastal areas and oceans, and will examine seven case studies that will help to bring alive the grave problems of mismanaging coastal and economic resources: the Black Sea, Newfoundland, the Louisiana Region of the Gulf of Mexico, Belize, the Marshall Islands, and Antarctica. The second part of the course will provide students with the opportunity to study major international conferences, treaties, and policy principles (including the Law of the Sea). In the final third of the course, students will examine regional as well as selected country coastal-zone policies.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will be familiar with important aspects of Integrated Coastal Zone Management
  2. Students will have basis for comparing globally separate policies
  3. Students will be able to assess the costs and benefits of different coastal zone management strategies around the world.
  4.  Students will be trained in the writing of short, tightly focused research projects.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0664

Description

The purpose of a coastal policy internship is to give students the opportunity to experience practical applications of the knowledge learned in academic courses related to CZMT. This will take place in a carefully supervised environment.  The internship also lets the student explore possible career options related to coastal zone policy or management, and make contacts and learn how to develop a network that can assist them in locating employment.  The student (subject to approval by the program) may arrange an internship on their own or apply for one that has become available. Internships must involve substantive assignments and will not be granted for clerical office work or other routine "labor". Reports every two weeks must be submitted and a final report written at the end of the project. A supervisor evaluation is also required.

Learning Outcomes

The student will be able to answer the following questions:

  1. How has your knowledge of coastal zone policy and/or management issue been broadened and deepened by this internship? What are three new ideas and concepts you learned on your internship that you did not know about the study of Coastal Policy? Do you see correspondence or contradictions between the accumulated body of facts and theories from your previous Coastal Policy courses and the "real" world as you experienced it in the internship? Explain. Can you cite specific concepts, assumptions, "established facts," prevailing views, and/or theories that have either been confirmed or disconfirmed in your experiences?
  2. List and describe the kinds of skills and techniques that you developed during your internship. Are there any skills that you improved such as enhancing your ability to analyze, gaining greater insight into coastal issue "politics", improving techniques of oral argument, presentation, and critique? How much writing and synthesizing of materials were required during your internship? Do you feel that the skills that you acquired can help you succeed after graduation in your profession of choice? In what ways has this internship enhanced your "job marketability?"
  3. In what ways has this experience enriched you personally? Have you learned more about yourself? How were your beliefs about coastal management or the science of coastal policy affected by this experience? In what one or two ways did you gain a greater understanding of the role and/or importance of coastal areas?

Course Numbers: CZMT-0694, MEVS-5060, OCMB-6350

Description

This course introduces basic fisheries science principles and techniques. Topics will include fisheries-related terminology and descriptions, basic age and growth techniques, fisheries population modeling and stock assessment concepts, and an introduction to marine fisheries management.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing this course will:

  1. Be familiar with basic fisheries science terminology and concepts;
  2. Understand basic age and growth sampling and analytical techniques, including histological preservation and preparation;
  3. Be able to identify parameters necessary for and complete basic stock assessment modeling problems;
  4. Understand fisheries data collection requirements and issues;
  5. Discuss basic fisheries management issues.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0685, MEVS-5107, OCMB 6315

Description

Globally, biodiversity is being dramatically altered by human activities. This is especially evident in the marine environment. Because many species remain undiscovered, and ecological roles of existing species are poorly understood, the magnitude of these changes is difficult to evaluate.

This course will discuss multiple aspects of marine biodiversity including: definition and importance of marine biodiversity to marine conservation issues; threats to marine biodiversity including non-indigenous species introductions; impediments to marine conservation; scientific constraints; developing tools and forums for conserving marine biodiversity, and evaluating existing marine biodiversity initiatives currently in place and planned. Management approaches such as marine protected areas, no-take or completely protected reserves, and special management areas will be discussed and evaluated.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing this course will:

  1. Understand the complex nature of the process that affect and control marine biodiversity
  2. Learn the history of biodiversity, both in a traditional sense and the post-modern synthesis now taking place
  3. Will be familiar with the major paradigms used to explain biogeographic pattern, and how emerging studies are calling into question long-held traditions and beliefs of what marine biodiversity is and how it is managed.
  4. Understand the power of hypothetico deductive methods, and how it is employed in pattern process models of biodiversity
  5. Identify threats to biodiversity and what mechanisms are emerging to address loss of biodiversity
  6. Gain understanding of the impact and rapid spread of non-indigenous marine species, methods of introduction and spread, and current control measures
  7. Gain knowledge of how major fisheries management programs relate to biodiversity loss and conservation
  8.  Have a detailed understanding of the global, basin, regional, and local threats to marine environments and be able to conceptualize research and management actions to prevent loss of diversity
  9. Understand major legislative and legal actions of governments and institutions that have been enacted to deal with threats to biodiversity.
  10. Measure the success/failure of current action strategies, such as Marine Protected Areas, by applying lessons learned and incorporation of emerging methods and data sources.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0945

Description

The online course consists of several power point presentations with voice-over as well as discussion topics and class interactive hypothetical scenarios. Lectures will address the logic of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) and their advantages and disadvantage. The science of MPA will be presented as well an overview of traditional approaches to fisheries management. The importance of ecological principles when creating an MPA will be emphasized. An overview of sampling theory and need for empirical data to document the success or failure of MPA will be presented.

Learning Outcomes

Upon course completion, students will have gained an:

  1. Understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of MPA as a fisheries management tool.
  2. Understanding of the hypothesis testing relative to creation and monitoring of an MPA.
  3. Understanding of various stakeholders and user groups of fisheries common use resources.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0603 and MCCC 5400

Description

A hodgepodge of laws and approaches apply to the oceans and coasts. Rights divide among private landowners, resource extractors, local governments, national governments, or international authorities. Today a great period of legal adjustment is in motion as many living systems collapse, bearing social and economic consequences. Much ocean and coastal law is already a story of failure followed by rethinking or reconstruction. This background law is now asked to rise to the task of enabling prevention of global climate change, and to the task of adaptation to its impacts which elude prevention. This course is about how law copes with emerging science and policy. It depicts examples of legal success and of disappointment to highlight the mechanisms and principles of law. From the examples, we understand and can recollect how these laws are created, revised, processed into regulations and administered. Limits on agencies and courts to make interpretation, apply science in legal settings, and enforce are evaluated.

Learning Outcomes

Upon course completion, students will

  1. Become broadly familiar with the main ideas by which certain major ocean and coastal resources are addressed by law
  2. Appreciate from a study of detail how interdisciplinary approaches of science, planning and law are accomplished today
  3. Increase knowledge of the specific mechanism of law within an interest area specific to the student e.g. coastal planning, coral reef management
  4. Improve personal ability to locate and understand legal regulatory activities about ocean and coastal resources
  5. Engage in critical thought of the significance of key actions affecting national and international ocean policy

Course Numbers: CZMT-0686

Description

This course gives a broad view to how the physical and biological factors are governing the distribution of the marine life and how the ocean influences climate variability.  Human activities impact the orderly functioning of the ocean (and other components of the Earth system) by altering cycling rates and disturbing the equilibrium of biochemical cycles.  Students will learn how society is attempting to minimize these impacts, remediate past damage, and avoid future problems.  Answers to these and other questions require observational data on the ocean's properties and processes.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0735

Description

This course will cover the cover the chemistry and environmental impacts of oil spills and pollution on the marine environment. Topics will include the effects of oil on various organisms and ecosystems. Current and historical oil spills and other major pollution events and their clean-up will be analyzed and evaluated.

Learning Outcomes

Objectives are:

  1. To give the student a better understanding of what is involved when an oil spill occurs.
  2. Present them with tools and knowledge to scientifically evaluate effects.
  3. Have an idea of what treatment or remediation will be affective.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0688, MEVS-5250, OCMB-6323

Description

The course explores the theoretical framework of population and community ecology expressed in mathematical terms. Students learn to read formulae, graphs and to write their own code in Matlab that develops basic modeling and data evaluation/projection skills.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Increased quantitative understanding of population and community processes, understanding of the mathematical and logical tools used in theoretical ecology.
  2.  Basic ability to model populations in Math lab.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0715, BCOR-5580, MEVS-5480, OCMB-8550

Description

This course provides a broad historical overview of biological sciences since Aristotle through Darwin with emphasis on both the experimental design of seminal studies as well as the evolving philosophical approaches to the acquisition of knowledge from methodological naturalism to critical rationalism, Karl Popper and the hypothetico-deductive model for scientific method.

Learning Outcomes

The student will:

  1.  be familiar with the history of biological sciences including selected scientists and their famed experiments.
  2. be familiar with the history of the philosophical underpinnings of the current definitions of science and the scientific method.
  3. be able to use the hypothetico-deductive method in their own research and the student will understand both the strengths and shortcomings of this method.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0800, MEVS-5300, OCMB-8500, BMME-5565

Description

This course is designed to provide tools, resources, and approaches to improve a student’s ability to write in a scientifically precise and accurate manner and to interrelate complex conceptual issues in a coherent manner. The skills acquired while learning to write a grant proposal are very similar to the skills needed to write a project plan or scientific paper. Thus, by building grant-writing skills, general scientific writing skills are improved in equal measure.  This course is an intensive introduction of how to prepare, write, edit, and review a standard grant proposal. Proposal writing is essential in the competitive scientific job market, but it can be intimidating to the novice.

Learning Outcomes

Participants in this course will be expected to write a grant proposal in their field of interest as a class project. The following topic areas will be presented and developed:

  1. How to identify viable research topics
  2. How to assemble relevant information and data into an outline
  3. Identifying funding sources
  4. Writing abstracts and summaries
  5. Different writing styles for various audiences
  6. Targeting proposals to specific funding agencies
  7. Editing and reviewing for scientific content
  8. Improving both oral and written presentations

Course Numbers: CZMT-0910, BMME-5800, MEVS-5450, OCMB-6500

Description

Stable isotope ratios provide a natural way to follow and trace elemental cycling in a number of environments. This course will focus on the use CHNOS isotope distribution and cycling in different biomes. The information provided will cover migration and invasion, food webs, mixing, plants, animals, microbes, atmospheric gases; and the focus of the course will be more closely tailored to the needs of students. Students will process a limited number of individual project samples and learn to interpret the stable isotope data. Course evaluation will be based on participation, a project report and a research paper on the use and evolution of stable isotopes in an area of environmental science.

Learning Outcomes

The students will acquire:

  1. A background and working knowledge of stable isotope ratios
  2. Learn how to identify how isotopes tracers can help solve environmental questions
  3.  Sample processing techniques, laboratory analysis and data interpretation for many types of biological material.
  4. Students will be able to identify how to appropriately use stable isotope ratios to answer ecological questions

Course Numbers: CZMT-0690, MEVS-5000, OCMB-6120

Description

Study of the ecology of tropical fish, including coastal, estuary, mangrove, and pelagic fish.  Current theories on distributions and abundance are discussed in addition to ecological theory.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0698 MEVS-5510, OCMB-6380

Description

This course is designed for the student with an intermediate level of experience with fisheries science (e.g., taken the Introduction to Marine Fisheries Science course). During the four-week course, students will examine the main structures of fisheries management and policy development at the federal level, including Fishery Management Plans and various regulatory mechanisms. The course will also provide background and current issues for the main legislation that governs U.S. fisheries management, from the Fisheries Conservation and Management Act of 1976 (and its subsequent reauthorizations) to the Endangered Species Protection Act (ESA) of 1966 and the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) of 1972. The students will also be exposed to the development process of fisheries policy, including the roles of regulatory review and Congressional oversight.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the main U.S. laws that govern federal marine fisheries management, including the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Management and Conservation Act/Sustainable Fisheries Act, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the National Environmental Protection Act.
  2. Explain the basic structure of U.S. federal fisheries management, including descriptions of a Fisheries Management Plan and a Regional Fishery Management Council, and how domestic fisheries management interacts with international (multi-lateral/regional) fisheries management organizations.
  3. Describe the general roles of non-NOAA federal agencies in fisheries management and enforcement, including the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the State Department.
  4. Describe some of the goal-setting and performance metrics used by NOAA to evaluate fisheries policy options and subsequent regulatory actions.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0710

Description

This course will introduce students to the expanding international dialogue regarding water and the coastal zone that is now occurring amongst the scientific, interfaith and policy communities. We will consider and evaluate whether this may result in new understanding and a greater commitment towards our stewardship of water, and particularly the coastal environment.

Learning Outcomes

Upon course completion, students will have:

  1.  A clearer perspective on cross-cultural dimensions of resource management.
  2.  Examined the distinctive ecological attitudes, values and practices of some of the major world religions, and the ecological commonalities that exist within and among these traditions.
  3. Considered the ongoing cross-cultural dialogue between the scientific, faith and local communities regarding the perceived impact of climate change, and the response.
  4.  Been made aware of various related international policy options (e.g. The Earth Charter, Assisi Declarations, work by United Nations Environment Program, the environmental code of conduct, as well as other international and national ethically-based agreements).

Course Numbers: CZMT-0790

Description

This short course will feature readings, discussions, short digital video interviews and video case studies, and short lectures by the instructors. We will examine the context of futurology of coastal zones and oceans. Students will be assessed for participation in on-line discussions, short student video contributions to the class, and weekly written brainstorming notes on the weekly topics. The major themes of the course are:

  1. Climate change and the urgency for humans to restore climate balance.
  2. The interaction of human activity and climate.
  3. Futuristic oceanic and coastal zone settlement and manufacturing ideas.
  4. Futuristic energy systems, climate, and the ethics of proposed human engineering of climate and habitat.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the key concepts and issues of global climate change as they relate to coastal policy.
  2. Assess many of the key futuristic solutions to climate change that have been proposed by scientists and others.
  3. Discuss and evaluate the ethical problems of manipulating nature both as a by-product of human activity (as collateral damage) and as a deliberate strategy as suggested by coastal and ocean futurologists.
  4. Evaluate and discuss the global governance issues associated with climate change policy and futuristic initiatives

Course Numbers: CZMT-0775

Description

Directed study in aspects of coastal zone management. May also be used, under special circumstances, for completion of capstone/thesis proposal. Requires prior consultation with major professor.

Learning Outcomes

The student will learn detailed, scientific skills and knowledge through one-on-one tutorial based interaction with their supervising professor.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0681

Description

Research and thesis preparation. Requires prior consultation with major professor and submission of an approved thesis proposal.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The student will learn about hypothesis driven research.
  2. The student will learn scientific methods.
  3. The student will learn how to handle large databases (statistically).
  4. The student will learn scientific writing.
  5. The student will gain experience presenting complex data in public.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0683

Description

Research and thesis preparation. Requires prior consultation with major professor and submission of an approved thesis proposal.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The student will learn about hypothesis driven research.
  2. The student will learn scientific methods.
  3. The student will learn how to handle large databases (statistically).
  4. The student will learn scientific writing.
  5. The student will gain experience presenting complex data in public.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0684

Description

Research and thesis preparation. Requires prior consultation with major professor and submission of an approved thesis proposal.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The student will learn about hypothesis driven research.
  2. The student will learn scientific methods.
  3. The student will learn how to handle large databases (statistically).
  4. The student will learn scientific writing.
  5. The student will gain experience presenting complex data in public.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0701

Description

An extended literature review of a subject approved by the student’s advisory committee. The paper should demonstrate proficiency in library research, organization, and writing. Requires prior consultation with major professor and submission of an approved capstone proposal.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The student will learn how to research scientific topics using published information.
  2. The student will master the art of compiling a scientific review of a subject.
  3. The student will gain experience in scientific writing.
  4. The student will learn how to present a seminar.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0702

Description

An extended literature review of a subject approved by the student’s advisory committee. The paper should demonstrate proficiency in library research, organization, and writing. Requires prior consultation with major professor and submission of an approved capstone proposal.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The student will learn how to research scientific topics using published information.
  2. The student will master the art of compiling a scientific review of a subject.
  3. The student will gain experience in scientific writing.
  4. The student will learn how to present a seminar.

Course Numbers: CZMT-0704

Description

An extended literature review of a subject approved by the student’s advisory committee. The paper should demonstrate proficiency in library research, organization, and writing. Requires prior consultation with major professor and submission of an approved capstone proposal.

Learning Outcomes

  1. The student will learn how to research scientific topics using published information.
  2. The student will master the art of compiling a scientific review of a subject.
  3. The student will gain experience in scientific writing.
  4. The student will learn how to present a seminar.