NSU's Oceanographic Center
(home of the Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Ecosystems Research)

Subject Matter Experts

Beach Erosion

  • Richard Dodge, Ph.D.
    Dean
    Oceanographic Center
    Executive Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Dodge is the author of many scientific publications and reports. He has expertise on the effects of natural and man-induced impacts to coral reefs. He has served as an expert witness on coral reef injuries. He has been a board member of the Marine Industries Association of South Florida. He is past geological editor and managing editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs. He served for five years as a member of the Scientific Review Board of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute to oversee a Minerals Management Service project on the Galeta oil spill assessment. Dodge has conducted oil spill experiments in Panama to assess effects of oil and dispersed oil on tropical ecosystems. He is a former member of the coral advisory committee for the Southeast Atlantic Fisheries Management Council and currently on the coral advisory committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Dodge is a founding member of the Florida Coastal Ocean Observing System Caucus and Research Consortium. 

  • Dave Gilliam, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Gilliam looks at coral reef and fish ecology as applied to restoration, assessment, and monitoring. He currently manages two southeast Florida reef monitoring projects which include assessing and monitoring reef and benthic fish communities and sedimentation. He is also assessing the success of several reef restoration projects and investigating methods to improve restoration success. Currently, Broward County, Florida has installed and maintains a system of 110 mooring buoys located in many popular fishing and diving locations along the reef. Gilliam monitors these as part of his work. This research will determine how often private and commercial boaters are currently using the mooring buoys and how effective the buoys are at protecting the reef. Gilliam’s research areas include coral reef and reef fish ecology, assessment, restoration and monitoring. He is also interested in the processes that affect coral reef fish recruitment and artificial reef design and function.

Climate Change/Global Warming

  • Richard Dodge, Ph.D.
    Dean
    Oceanographic Center
    Executive Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Dodge is the author of many scientific publications and reports. He has expertise on the effects of natural and man-induced impacts to coral reefs. He has served as an expert witness on coral reef injuries. He has been a board member of the Marine Industries Association of South Florida. He is past geological editor and managing editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs. He served for five years as a member of the Scientific Review Board of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute to oversee a Minerals Management Service project on the Galeta oil spill assessment. Dodge has conducted oil spill experiments in Panama to assess effects of oil and dispersed oil on tropical ecosystems. He is a former member of the coral advisory committee for the Southeast Atlantic Fisheries Management Council and currently on the coral advisory committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Dodge is a founding member of the Florida Coastal Ocean Observing System Caucus and Research Consortium. 

  • Bernhard Riegl, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
    Associate Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Riegl is both a biologist and geologist, as his research and publications have involved the paleontology, sedimentology, spatial dynamics, ecology, taxonomy, and conservation biology of coral reefs and associated organisms. He is the geology editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs, and editor of the book series Coral Reefs of the World. He has held grants from the Austrian Science Foundation, the South African Foundation for Research Development, the South African Association for Marine Biological Research, NOAA, the U.S. Navy, the World Wildlife Fund, the Austrian Geological Survey, the U.S. Geological Survey and many other local and international agencies.  He has served as Commission of the European Community and USAID technical advisor in the environmental departments of several Middle Eastern governments and has played an active role in the development of coastal zone management, conservation strategies for coral reefs and environmental legislation.
Riegl's research centers on coral reefs and other tropical benthic biota, such as seagrass and algae.  He is also active in hydrographic survey, particularly sonar-based seafloor discrimination, which he integrates with optical remote-sensing to provide high-resolution maps of the seafloor. His research has taken place in the Red Sea, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean, South Pacific, Eastern Pacific, tropical Atlantic and Caribbean.

Coral Reefs

  • Richard Dodge, Ph.D.
    Dean
    Oceanographic Center
    Executive Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background:Dodge has served as editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs and now serves on its editorial board. He was the chair of the Local Organizing Committee of the 11th International Coral Reef Symposium 2008. He is an elected board member of the Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA). 

Dodge is a recognized authority on corals and coral reefs. His research has centered on the growth rates of reef-building corals, coral reef structure, fossil coral reefs, the ecology of recent corals reefs, coral reef damage assessment, and oil effects on corals and coral reefs. He has conducted reef related research in Haiti, Saudi Arabia, Puerto Rico, Barbados, Jamaica, the Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, Panama, Cayman Islands, Bermuda and Florida. Dodge has held grants and contracts for reef related work from the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Navy, Florida SeaGrant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Environmental Protection Agency, South Florida Water Management District, Marine Spill Response Corporation, Office of Naval Research, State of Florida, Broward County Department of Planning and Environmental Protection, and the U.S. Department of Justice. He is the author of many publications in the scientific literature and reports for various agencies and companies. He has also served as an expert witness.

  • Bernhard Riegl, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
    Associate Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Riegl is both a biologist and geologist, as his research and publications have involved the paleontology, sedimentology, spatial dynamics, ecology, taxonomy, and conservation biology of coral reefs and associated organisms. He is the geology editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs, and editor of the book series Coral Reefs of the World. He has held grants from the Austrian Science Foundation, the South African Foundation for Research Development, the South African Association for Marine Biological Research, NOAA, the U.S. Navy, the World Wildlife Fund, the Austrian Geological Survey, the U.S. Geological Survey and many other local and international agencies.  He has served as Commission of the European Community and USAID technical advisor in the environmental departments of several Middle Eastern governments and has played an active role in the development of coastal zone management, conservation strategies for coral reefs and environmental legislation. Riegl's research centers on coral reefs and other tropical benthic biota, such as seagrass and algae.  He is also active in hydrographic survey, particularly sonar-based seafloor discrimination, which he integrates with optical remote-sensing to provide high-resolution maps of the seafloor. His research has taken place in the Red Sea, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean, South Pacific, Eastern Pacific, tropical Atlantic and Caribbean.

  • Sam Purkis, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Purkis’ research has taken him around the world. His background and current projects are based around the theme of remote sensing techniques to monitor coral reef systems. He has traveled extensively in the Middle East, Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to fuse observations made from space, with ecological observations made on the ground in order to unravel the dynamics of coral habitats at reef-scale. He uses LiDAR, acoustic remote sensing, and regularly collaborates to work on developing mapping software (HMT, NERST, CarbEmu).

Purkis is the author of numerous scientific publications and technical reports for various agencies and companies. He recently co-authored a book entitled, Remote Sensing and the Global Environmental Change, with Victor Klemas from the University of Delaware. Topics covered in the text include degrading coral reefs, melting ice caps, sea-level rise, urban sprawl, and global changes in vegetation. It’s an invaluable reference for environmental scientists and managers who require an overview of the use of remote sensing in monitoring and mapping environmental change at regional and global scales. Currently, his research interests are in applied sedimentology, petroleum, and marine geology.  

  • Dave Gilliam, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Gilliam looks at coral reef and fish ecology as applied to restoration, assessment, and monitoring. He currently manages two southeast Florida reef monitoring projects which include assessing and monitoring reef and benthic fish communities and sedimentation. He is also assessing the success of several reef restoration projects and investigating methods to improve restoration success. Currently, Broward County, Florida has installed and maintains a system of 110 mooring buoys located in many popular fishing and diving locations along the reef. Gilliam monitors these as part of his work.  This research will determine how often private and commercial boaters are currently using the mooring buoys and how effective the buoys are at protecting the reef. Gilliam’s research areas include coral reef and reef fish ecology, assessment, restoration and monitoring. He is also interested in the processes that affect coral reef fish recruitment and artificial reef design and function.

  • D. Abigail Renegar, M.S.
    Researcher
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Renegar’s research focuses on scleractinian coral biology, conservation, and restoration, with emphasis on coral response to climate change, global warming, land-based sources of pollution, ocean acidification, and global warming. She manages the coral histology laboratory, which utilizes histological and ultrastructural analytical techniques to examine multiple aspects of coral physiology and health. Application of these tools aids in the elucidating the influence of anthropogenic environmental factors on coral health, and provides key information for the prediction and management of future coral condition and growth.

Renegar also directs the land-based coral nursery, which houses corals that are available for experimentation and restoration. With coral reefs worldwide facing degradation due to pollution, overfishing, climate change and development, the transplant of healthy corals back to the reef is important for restoring damaged reefs. In February of 2012, Renegar supervised the transplant of colonies of the threatened staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis) from the on-land nursery to a shallow reef site off the coast of Broward County, Florida. This event marked the first time that corals grown in an on-land nursery were transplanted in Broward County, and its success is an important step forward in the development of restoration strategies to address the critical issues facing coral reefs worldwide.

  • Nicole Fogarty, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Fogarty uses a multidisciplinary approach of field ecology, laboratory experiments, and molecular biology to answer questions related to coral: reproduction, speciation, reproductive isolation, demography, settlement under various stressors, chimeras, recruitment in the field, and recruit detection using fluorescence. In recent years she has presented this research at over 15 conferences and academic institutions. Fogarty has conducted research on coral reefs in Florida, the Bahamas, Antigua, Curacao, Bonaire, Belize, Panama, Bermuda, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. She has obtained funding from the National Geographic Society, the Smithsonian Institution’s Marine Science Network, the Smithsonian Institution Walcott Endowment, the American Academy of Underwater Science, the PADI Foundation Research Scholarship, PADI Aware, the Florida State University International Dissertation Research Fellowship, the Lerner-Gray Marine Research Scholarship, and the Florida State University's International Dissertation Research Fellowship, and Florida State University’s Short, Bennison, and Gramling Scholarships.

Coral Reef Computer Modeling

  • Matthew Johnston, M.S.
    Scientific Computer Programmer
    Oceanographic Center


     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Johnston is a computer programmer and biologist with a background in software development, invasive species modeling, and web design. He has previously worked on large enterprise-scale software applications. He is responsible for the continued development of Coral Point Count with Excel Extension (CPCe) and Visual HEA proprietary software packages developed at the Oceanographic Center. CPCe is used worldwide for coral reef assessment data collection and analysis. It is provided free for scientific use and study of coral reefs. He also maintains Visual HEA (Habitat Equivalency Analysis). This software is provided free of charge and contains a useful graphical user interface for the complex calculations of the amount compensatory restoration that is needed to provide lost services due to a natural or manmade environmental damage.

Johnston is the developer of the shark tracking websites for the Guy Harvey Research Institute and the Living Oceans Foundation Global Reef Expedition tracking site. He has also held grants with the International Union for Conservation of Nature IUCN for work on several web development projects. Johnston’s research in invasive species modeling has produced a web-accessible software tool which can be used to help predict the spread of marine invasive species, such as the lionfish. His modeling software combines remotely sensed oceanographic measurements with historical records to analyze patterns of invasion. Johnston has authored scientific publications based on his work. His current research aims to continue development of the invasion model on a temporal and spatial scale.

Deep-Sea Biology

  • Tamara Frank, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center


     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Frank's research focuses on how light controls the distribution pattern of midwater animals, as well as functional adaptations of photoreceptors to different light environments, including both downwelling light and bioluminescence. Midwater of the ocean is defined as that enormous region that lies in darkness below the sunlit upper ocean and above the seafloor. The midwater volume contains the largest animal communities on earth. However, they are largely unexplored. Even rudimentary estimates of their biodiversity are gross approximations. Frank’s work combines in situ studies from submersibles to quantify animal distribution patterns with shipboard based laboratory studies on the photosensitivity of animals brought up with midwater trawl nets and deep-sea traps. Her work on coastal species examines how their photoreceptor physiology is correlated with their predatory behavior and activity levels. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the NOAA National Undersea Research Program, the NOAA Ocean Exploration program and NOAA NRDA. She has been chief scientist on 50 research cruises, and participated on 40 more as a lucky hitchhiker, conducting work off the coasts of the Bahamas, California, the Canary Islands, Cuba, Costa Rica, Florida, Iceland, Hawaii and Samoa.

Environment

  • Richard Dodge, Ph.D.
    Dean
    Oceanographic Center
    Executive Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Dodge is the author of many scientific publications and reports. He has expertise on the effects of natural and man-induced impacts to coral reefs. He has served as an expert witness on coral reef injuries. He has been a board member of the Marine Industries Association of South Florida. He is past geological editor and managing editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs. He served for five years as a member of the Scientific Review Board of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute to oversee a Minerals Management Service project on the Galeta oil spill assessment. Dodge has conducted oil spill experiments in Panama to assess effects of oil and dispersed oil on tropical ecosystems. He is a former member of the coral advisory committee for the Southeast Atlantic Fisheries Management Council and currently on the coral advisory committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Dodge is a founding member of the Florida Coastal Ocean Observing System Caucus and Research Consortium.

Environmental Policy

  • Richard Dodge, Ph.D.
    Dean
    Oceanographic Center
    Executive Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Dodge is the author of many scientific publications and reports. He has expertise on the effects of natural and man-induced impacts to coral reefs. He has served as an expert witness on coral reef injuries. He has been a board member of the Marine Industries Association of South Florida. He is past geological editor and managing editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs. He served for five years as a member of the Scientific Review Board of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute to oversee a Minerals Management Service project on the Galeta oil spill assessment. Dodge has conducted oil spill experiments in Panama to assess effects of oil and dispersed oil on tropical ecosystems. He is a former member of the coral advisory committee for the Southeast Atlantic Fisheries Management Council and currently on the coral advisory committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Dodge is a founding member of the Florida Coastal Ocean Observing System Caucus and Research Consortium. 

Fisheries

  • Dave Kerstetter, Ph.D.
    Research Scientist, Adjunct Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Kerstetter’s background is a combination of marine fisheries science and public policy, and his research interests are accordingly focused on direct, applied fisheries research projects. Kerstetter is involved with both commercial and recreational fisheries.  Recently, he has started research in more traditional fisheries science with work on age-growth, diet, and reproduction of selected mesopelagic and pelagic fishes. In addition to the fieldwork and research projects, Kerstetter feels that it’s essential for the field to engage the public regarding marine fisheries management and fisheries science. As part of this outreach, he regularly acts as a resource to the public and has contributed to popular magazines such as Sport Fishing and Florida Sportsman. He has also served in a more formal advisory service role by serving on management committees and scientific panels, including the U.S. Advisory Committee to the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) and the Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Team for pilot whales and Risso's dolphins.

  • Mahmood Shivji, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
    Director, NSU Guy Harvey Research Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Shivji’s research, which has garnered international attention, integrates genetic and field research to provide information that improves conservation of threatened populations of sharks and billfish. The focus of his research is on developing and using molecular genetic approaches to investigate various aspects of the ecology, evolution, conservation and management of marine organisms, with an emphasis on elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) and coral reef biota.  He also utilizes acoustic and satellite telemetry techniques to examine movement patterns of elasmobranchs.  Shivji’s research has garnered international attention, and is consistently covered in major media outlets, including Time, Newsweek, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Economist, the BBC and National Public Radio. His research on the shark fin trade and its impacts on shark populations is currently being exhibited in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC. His research interests include molecular ecology, genetic biodiversity and connectivity, elasmobranchs, coral reefs, and conservation biology.

  • Richard Spieler, Ph.D.
    Professor and Director of Academic Programs
    Oceanographic Center
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Spieler’s background is in ichthyology, and his research on fishes covers a wide range of disciplines including anatomy, physiology, natural history, and distribution. His areas of interest include biological rhythms, distribution and natural history, artificial reefs, coral reef restoration, anatomy, and neuroendocrinology. Current research focuses primarily on distributional and assessment studies as well as artificial reef function relative to fishes and coral reef restoration.

Hurricanes

  • Alex V. Soloviev, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Soloviev teaches physical oceanography courses at the NSU Oceanographic Center and is also an adjunct professor at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. His research interests include turbulence and microstructure in the near-surface layer of the ocean, coastal ocean circulation, bio-physical interactions in the ocean, and ocean engineering. He was previously a visiting scientist at the University of Hawaii and University of Hamburg, P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology and A.M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics. He has participated in several major oceanographic experiments (POLYMODE, JASIN, FGGE, TOGA COARE, GASEX) and is the author and co-author of more than 50 research articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Recently, in co-authorship with Professor Roger Lukas from the University of Hawaii, he wrote a monograph The Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean: Structure, Dynamics, and Applications, published by Springer. Soloviev has been principle investigator (PI) and co-PI on a number of research projects funded by the federal government and private companies.

Invasive Species Modeling

  • Matthew Johnston, M.S.
    Scientific Computer Programmer
    Oceanographic Center


     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Johnston is a computer programmer and biologist with a background in software development, invasive species modeling, and web design. He has previously worked on large enterprise-scale software applications. He is responsible for the continued development of Coral Point Count with Excel Extension (CPCe) and Visual HEA proprietary software packages developed at the Oceanographic Center. CPCe is used worldwide for coral reef assessment data collection and analysis. It is provided free for scientific use and study of coral reefs. He also maintains Visual HEA (Habitat Equivalency Analysis). This software is provided free of charge and contains a useful graphical user interface for the complex calculations of the amount compensatory restoration that is needed to provide lost services due to a natural or manmade environmental damage.

Johnston is the developer of the shark tracking websites for the Guy Harvey Research Institute and the Living Oceans Foundation Global Reef Expedition tracking site. He has also held grants with the International Union for Conservation of Nature IUCN for work on several web development projects. Johnston’s research in invasive species modeling has produced a web-accessible software tool which can be used to help predict the spread of marine invasive species, such as the lionfish. His modeling software combines remotely sensed oceanographic measurements with historical records to analyze patterns of invasion. Johnston has authored scientific publications based on his work. His current research aims to continue development of the invasion model on a temporal and spatial scale.

Invertebrate Reproduction and Speciation

  • Nicole Fogarty, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Oceanographic Center


     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Fogarty's research focuses on ecological and evolutionary questions related to the fertilization success of broadcast spawners. She is particularly interested in how density dependent mechanisms of reproduction will influence invertebrate population recovery, as well as spawning synchrony, reproductive isolation, and speciation. She has conducted research in the following areas: coral hybridization, pre- and postzygotic isolating mechanisms in corals, polyspermy in sea urchin and corals, clonal structure of corals, the genetics and pheromones involved in corals spawning synchrony, and impact of pollutants on sea urchin fertilization and larval viability. Fogarty’s dissertation research focused on the hybridization dynamics and reproductive isolation between two threatened species of corals, Acropora palmata and A. cervicornis. In addition, she and colleagues have examined the components involved in coral spawning synchrony and the prezygotic isolating barrier of conspecific sperm precedence in the Montastraea annularis species complex.

Marine Biodiversity and Crustaceans

  • James Darwin Thomas, PhD
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center


     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: During his career, Thomas has authored over 120 scientific articles, book chapters and reports. His research focus is measuring and assessing coral reef diversity using indicator organisms, especially cryptic and commensal species. A former Curator of Crustacea of the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution, Thomas served as the research director for the National Coral Reef Institute from 1999-2004. In addition, he has served as advisor to a variety of organizations including EPA, NSF, NOAA, and the National Academy of Sciences. He has speaks frequently as invited speaker and session chair at international conferences addressing issues of measuring and assessing tropical marine diversity. Thomas has conducted extensive field research in coral reef systems in the Pacific and Indian oceans and the Caribbean Sea, with a concentration in Indo-Malayan reef systems. In addition to his research, Thomas has served as an academic advisor to numerous colleges and universities on program evaluation and academic development issues. Thomas has described over 100 amphipod crustacean species in publications and faunal monographs, frequently incorporating indigenous cultural place names for new species to honor the countries in which they occur. He is privileged to have five species new to science named in his honor by colleagues.

Marine Microbiology and Symbiosis

  • Jose Lopez, PhD, PhD
    Assistant Professor
    Oceanographic Center


     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Microorganisms are omnipresent entities found in almost every habitat on earth, including the diverse marine habitats of the oceans. The single celled microbes play important roles in decomposition, food webs and natural products secondary metabolism. Perhaps most important for coral reef organisms, are microbial functions as intimate partners in macro-microorganismal symbiotic relationships. Lopez is applying various scientific techniques to obtain a better understanding of microbial functions and diversity. This includes methods such as microscopy, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), real time qPCR, deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and their phylogenetics, transcriptomics, genomics and metagenomics approaches. His molecular microbiology laboratory recently sequenced > 265,512 rRNA gene fragments with deep DNA sequencing technology from the microbial community of the local reef sponge, Axinella corrugata, which is known to produce an antitumor compound stevensine. Other diversity studies have revealed sponges as microbial reservoirs harboring potentially pathogenic bacteria that can infect neighboring corals and other reef organisms. Also a new Vibrio species was derived and recently named from a sponge. Lopez’s laboratory is now a part of the Earth Microbiome Project (earthmicrobiome.org) which aims to characterize microbial diversity in different habitats around the planet. Lopez is a member of the Florida branch of the American Society of Microbiology.

Molecular Evolution and Genomics

  • Jose Lopez, PhD
    Assistant Professor
    Oceanographic Center


     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Genomes, the complete hereditary material found in all living organisms, are dynamic entities that are constantly changing through mutation. Lopez has been using molecular methods for over twenty years, resulting in over 37 peer-reviewed scientific papers. He has applied modern molecular methods to characterize several types of genomics changes. Lopez has studied the dynamics of genome evolution in several diverse types of organisms, ranging from microbes to cats to corals and dolphins. The universal DNA molecules in all of these organsisms can act as living fossils for evolutionary reconstructions. He has coined the term “Numt” for nuclear mitochondrial DNA fragments that transpose from the mitochondrial organelle to the nucleus of the cat, subsequently found in many other eukaryotic taxa. Lopez has fully sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the domestic cat, and more recently has initiated efforts to sequence the even greater genomic depth of marine and aquatic invertebrates through GIGA – the “Global Invertebrate Genome Alliance”. Lopez’s laboratory also collaborate with members of the Porifera “Tree of Life” project, (www.portol.org), which aims to use molecular sequence data to construct robust models of evolutionary relationships with sponges at the base of the tree as the oldest animal ancestor at 500 million years. Lopez has forged several productive collaborations outside of NSU, which includes the FDA, Smithsonian Instituion and biotech companies such as Ocean Ridge Biosciences. Lopez actively serves as associate editor for the Journal of Heredity

Ocean Policy

  • Richard Dodge, Ph.D.
    Dean
    Oceanographic Center
    Executive Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Dodge is the author of many scientific publications and reports. He has expertise on the effects of natural and man-induced impacts to coral reefs. He has served as an expert witness on coral reef injuries. He has been a board member of the Marine Industries Association of South Florida. He is past geological editor and managing editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs. He served for five years as a member of the Scientific Review Board of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute to oversee a Minerals Management Service project on the Galeta oil spill assessment. Dodge has conducted oil spill experiments in Panama to assess effects of oil and dispersed oil on tropical ecosystems. He is a former member of the coral advisory committee for the Southeast Atlantic Fisheries Management Council and currently on the coral advisory committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Dodge is a founding member of the Florida Coastal Ocean Observing System Caucus and Research Consortium. 

Oil Spills

  • Richard Dodge, Ph.D.
    Dean
    Oceanographic Center
    Executive Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Dodge is the author of many scientific publications and reports. He has expertise on the effects of natural and man-induced impacts to coral reefs. He has served as an expert witness on coral reef injuries. He has been a board member of the Marine Industries Association of South Florida. He is past geological editor and managing editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs. He served for five years as a member of the Scientific Review Board of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute to oversee a Minerals Management Service project on the Galeta oil spill assessment. Dodge has conducted oil spill experiments in Panama to assess effects of oil and dispersed oil on tropical ecosystems. He is a former member of the coral advisory committee for the Southeast Atlantic Fisheries Management Council and currently on the coral advisory committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council. Dodge is a founding member of the Florida Coastal Ocean Observing System Caucus and Research Consortium.

Oil Ecotoxicology and Organismal Modeling

  • Jose Lopez, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Lopez has been developing marine sponges as experimental models for testing the biological effects of oil and dispersants used after oil spills. Several marine sponges are ubiquitous on coral reefs, and can filter thousands of liters of seawater everyday. This makes them potential accumulators of pollution, and proxies for sampling substances in the water column. Stemming from the Deepwater Horizon disaster in April 2010, the worst oil spill in American waters, Lopez obtained a BP based block grant distributed by the Florida Institute of Oceanography. With this funding support, he organized a team of collaborators from University of Miami (P Blackwelder), Florida International University (R Vega-Thurber, M. Cuvelier) and Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute/Florida Atlantic University (P. McCarthy), and the University of Chicago (J Gilbert) to test for changes in sponge symbiotic microbial communities and host gene expression after controlled dosing with actual Macondo crude oil and Corexit dispersants. Concentrations were sublethal in order to keep the organisms alive and to detect and measure slight shifts in biological activity. The results have generated more than 39 million new RNA transcript sequences, which will elucidate the biology and inner workings of one common Florida reef sponge, named Cinachyrella. New facilities at the COE will enable the continuation of these experiments in an environmentally safe manner.

Plate Tectonics

  • Sam Purkis, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Purkis’ research has taken him around the world. His background and current projects are based around the theme of remote sensing techniques to monitor coral reef systems. He has traveled extensively in the Middle East, Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to fuse observations made from space, with ecological observations made on the ground in order to unravel the dynamics of coral habitats at reef-scale. He uses LiDAR, acoustic remote sensing, and regularly collaborates to work on developing mapping software (HMT, NERST, CarbEmu).

Purkis is the author of numerous scientific publications and technical reports for various agencies and companies. He recently co-authored a book entitled, Remote Sensing and the Global Environmental Change, with Victor Klemas from the University of Delaware. Topics covered in the text include degrading coral reefs, melting ice caps, sea-level rise, urban sprawl, and global changes in vegetation. It’s an invaluable reference for environmental scientists and managers who require an overview of the use of remote sensing in monitoring and mapping environmental change at regional and global scales. Currently, his research interests are in applied sedimentology, petroleum, and marine geology.

  • Bernhard Riegl, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
    Associate Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Riegl is both a biologist and geologist, as his research and publications have involved the paleontology, sedimentology, spatial dynamics, ecology, taxonomy, and conservation biology of coral reefs and associated organisms. He is the geology editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs, and editor of the book series Coral Reefs of the World. He has held grants from the Austrian Science Foundation, the South African Foundation for Research Development, the South African Association for Marine Biological Research, NOAA, the U.S. Navy, the World Wildlife Fund, the Austrian Geological Survey, the U.S. Geological Survey and many other local and international agencies.  He has served as Commission of the European Community and USAID technical advisor in the environmental departments of several Middle Eastern governments and has played an active role in the development of coastal zone management, conservation strategies for coral reefs and environmental legislation. Riegl's research centers on coral reefs and other tropical benthic biota, such as seagrass and algae.  He is also active in hydrographic survey, particularly sonar-based seafloor discrimination, which he integrates with optical remote-sensing to provide high-resolution maps of the seafloor. His research has taken place in the Red Sea, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean, South Pacific, Eastern Pacific, tropical Atlantic and Caribbean.

Sea Floor/Mapping

  • Sam Purkis, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Purkis’ research has taken him around the world. His background and current projects are based around the theme of remote sensing techniques to monitor coral reef systems. He has traveled extensively in the Middle East, Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to fuse observations made from space, with ecological observations made on the ground in order to unravel the dynamics of coral habitats at reef-scale. He uses LiDAR, acoustic remote sensing, and regularly collaborates to work on developing mapping software (HMT, NERST, CarbEmu).

Purkis is the author of numerous scientific publications and technical reports for various agencies and companies. He recently co-authored a book entitled, Remote Sensing and the Global Environmental Change, with Victor Klemas from the University of Delaware. Topics covered in the text include degrading coral reefs, melting ice caps, sea-level rise, urban sprawl, and global changes in vegetation. It’s an invaluable reference for environmental scientists and managers who require an overview of the use of remote sensing in monitoring and mapping environmental change at regional and global scales. Currently, his research interests are in applied sedimentology, petroleum, and marine geology.

  • Bernhard Riegl, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
    Associate Director, NSU National Coral Reef Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Riegl is both a biologist and geologist, as his research and publications have involved the paleontology, sedimentology, spatial dynamics, ecology, taxonomy, and conservation biology of coral reefs and associated organisms. He is the geology editor of the international scientific journal Coral Reefs, and editor of the book series Coral Reefs of the World. He has held grants from the Austrian Science Foundation, the South African Foundation for Research Development, the South African Association for Marine Biological Research, NOAA, the U.S. Navy, the World Wildlife Fund, the Austrian Geological Survey, the U.S. Geological Survey and many other local and international agencies.  He has served as Commission of the European Community and USAID technical advisor in the environmental departments of several Middle Eastern governments and has played an active role in the development of coastal zone management, conservation strategies for coral reefs and environmental legislation. Riegl's research centers on coral reefs and other tropical benthic biota, such as seagrass and algae.  He is also active in hydrographic survey, particularly sonar-based seafloor discrimination, which he integrates with optical remote-sensing to provide high-resolution maps of the seafloor. His research has taken place in the Red Sea, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean, South Pacific, Eastern Pacific, tropical Atlantic and Caribbean.

  • Brian Walker, Ph.D.
    Research Scientist
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Walker’s primary research interests are seascape ecology, spatial analyses, benthic habitat mapping, coral reef fish ecology, and habitat impact assessment and restoration. Over the last 5 years, Walker has created benthic habitat maps of the seafloor for Broward, Palm Beach, and Miami-Dade counties, characterizing the seabed using a unique combined-technique approach in areas of deep or turbid waters. This method utilizes LIDAR bathymetry to obtain an image of the sea floor which is then visually interpreted into benthic habitats in GIS with the help of other data (e.g. aerial photography, subbottom profiling, etc.). Then acoustic ground discrimination is conducted to determine the density of organisms within the larger features. Current projects include Miami-Dade County benthic habitat mapping, Biscayne National Park LIDAR mapping, Martin County benthic habitat mapping, minimizing coral reef impacts from anchoring at Florida ports, NOAA Lower Keys benthic habitat mapping accuracy assessment, and SECREMP coral reef monitoring. He has recently been funded by a state wildlife grant to map the benthic habitats in Martin County. Walker also performs visual reef fish assessments, coral reef impact assessments and restoration, reef fish rotenone collection and ID, and radio telemetry tracking.

Sea Turtles

  • Curt Burney, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Burney is the Director of the Broward County Sea Turtle Conservation Program. His work involves looking at the factors that influence the spatial and temporal distribution of sea turtle nesting on Broward County beaches. His sea turtle program patrols beaches during nesting season and relocates those nests in hazardous areas. This program generates a large amount of data on nesting success, hatching success and temporal and spatial nesting patterns. In addition to sea turtle nesting distribution, he research interests include the interaction of marine microbes with dissolved organic matter in the sea.

Sharks

  • Mahmood Shivji, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
    Director, NSU Guy Harvey Research Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Shivji’s research, which has garnered international attention, integrates genetic and field research to provide information that improves conservation of threatened populations of sharks and billfish. The focus of his research is on developing and using molecular genetic approaches to investigate various aspects of the ecology, evolution, conservation and management of marine organisms, with an emphasis on elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) and coral reef biota.  He also utilizes acoustic and satellite telemetry techniques to examine movement patterns of elasmobranchs.  Shivji’s research has garnered international attention, and is consistently covered in major media outlets, including Time, Newsweek, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Economist, the BBC and National Public Radio. His research on the shark fin trade and its impacts on shark populations is currently being exhibited in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC. His research interests include molecular ecology, genetic biodiversity and connectivity, elasmobranchs, coral reefs, and conservation biology.

Sponges

  • Chuck Messing, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Messing is heavily involved with taxonomy and phylogeny of marine invertebrates. His work strives to clarify the systematic status and evolutionary relationships of living crinoids, as well as better understanding their ecology and distributions. His other primary area of research is in understanding distributional patterns and ecology of deep-water benthic invertebrate assemblages (e.g., corals, octocorals, echinoderms, sponges) associated with hard substrates at low latitudes, particularly as they relate to hydrodynamic conditions and biogeographic boundaries. Messing, along with an international team of experts, recently produced the South Florida Sponge Guide. This is a practical and interactive identification guide to the shallow-water marine sponges of South Florida, from the Indian River Lagoon through the Florida Keys, to Florida Bay and the Dry Tortugas. Messing’s areas of research include systematic, evolution, ecology, and biogeography of tropical deep-water hard-substrate assemblages.

  • Joe Lopez, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Lopez has an extensive background in molecular biology and phylogeny of marine sponges. Lopez began his work in biomedical research at the National Institutes of Health, which then led to a fellowship with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and then as a scientist at Florida Atlantic University-Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. Currently, Lopez is a professor at NSU’s Oceanographic Center, where a major research focus is to characterize the biodiversity, molecular ecology, and evolution of marine organisms and microorganisms through the application of modern molecular tools. He strives to tie together marine invertebrate-symbiosis, gene expression of interacting organisms and complex communities, molecular biology and microbiology, metagenomics and the molecular phylogeny of marine sponges. Lopez applies biotechnology, bioinformatics and genomics methods to accomplish this. One of his current projects is funded by the Florida SeaGrant College, and involves the characterization of gene expression patterns from diverse symbiotic microbial communities living within diverse marine invertebrates, such as deep sea sponges and corals. He also has ongoing collaborations focusing on the homeostasis and conservation of dwindling or unique marine habitats such as the Indian River Lagoon, and deep sea benthic invertebrate communities.  He also integrates microbial survey data with ongoing Census of Marine Life (COML) initiatives such as the International Census of Marine Microbes based in Woods Hole.

Tsunamis

  • Alex V. Soloviev, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Soloviev teaches physical oceanography courses at the NSU Oceanographic Center and is also an adjunct professor at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science. His research interests include turbulence and microstructure in the near-surface layer of the ocean, coastal ocean circulation, bio-physical interactions in the ocean, and ocean engineering. He was previously a visiting scientist at the University of Hawaii and University of Hamburg, P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology and A.M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics. He has participated in several major oceanographic experiments (POLYMODE, JASIN, FGGE, TOGA COARE, GASEX) and is the author and co-author of more than 50 research articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Recently, in co-authorship with Professor Roger Lukas from the University of Hawaii, he wrote a monograph The Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean: Structure, Dynamics, and Applications, published by Springer. Soloviev has been principle investigator (PI) and co-PI on a number of research projects funded by the federal government and private companies.

Wild Fishes/Bill Fish

  • Mahmood Shivji, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Oceanographic Center
    Director, NSU Guy Harvey Research Institute
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Shivji’s research, which has garnered international attention, integrates genetic and field research to provide information that improves conservation of threatened populations of sharks and billfish. The focus of his research is on developing and using molecular genetic approaches to investigate various aspects of the ecology, evolution, conservation and management of marine organisms, with an emphasis on elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) and coral reef biota.  He also utilizes acoustic and satellite telemetry techniques to examine movement patterns of elasmobranchs.  Shivji’s research has garnered international attention, and is consistently covered in major media outlets, including Time, Newsweek, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Economist, the BBC and National Public Radio. His research on the shark fin trade and its impacts on shark populations is currently being exhibited in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC. His research interests include molecular ecology, genetic biodiversity and connectivity, elasmobranchs, coral reefs, and conservation biology.

  • Dave Kerstetter, Ph.D.
    Research Scientist, Adjunct Professor
    Oceanographic Center
     
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Kerstetter’s background is a combination of marine fisheries science and public policy, and his research interests are accordingly focused on direct, applied fisheries research projects. Kerstetter is involved with both commercial and recreational fisheries.  Recently, he has started research in more traditional fisheries science with work on age-growth, diet, and reproduction of selected mesopelagic and pelagic fishes. In addition to the fieldwork and research projects, Kerstetter feels that it’s essential for the field to engage the public regarding marine fisheries management and fisheries science. As part of this outreach, he regularly acts as a resource to the public and has contributed to popular magazines such as Sport Fishing and Florida Sportsman. He has also served in a more formal advisory service role by serving on management committees and scientific panels, including the U.S. Advisory Committee to the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) and the Atlantic Pelagic Longline Take Reduction Team for pilot whales and Risso's dolphins.

  • Richard Spieler, Ph.D.
    Professor and Director of Academic Programs
    Oceanographic Center
     
     

  • Media Contact: Joseph Donzelli, Associate Director, Office of Public Affairs
    NSU  Division of Advancement and Community Relations
    W: 954-262-2159 | 954-661-4571 (cell)
    Email: jdonzelli@nova.edu

Background: Spieler’s background is in ichthyology, and his research on fishes covers a wide range of disciplines including anatomy, physiology, natural history, and distribution. His areas of interest include biological rhythms, distribution and natural history, artificial reefs, coral reef restoration, anatomy, and neuroendocrinology. Current research focuses primarily on distributional and assessment studies as well as artificial reef function relative to fishes and coral reef restoration.