Photo: Institute for the Study of Human Service, Health & Justice

MHS in Child Protection

Curriculum

The Master's program is comprised of a 33 credits. The core curriculum is comprised of six courses (24 credits). The concentrations are comprised of three courses (9 credits).

Core Courses (24 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the legal framework for child protection proceedings. It is designed to introduce students to the basic legal concepts governing child protection law, providing them with a background in the legal process and assisting them in understanding how that process responds to the particularized needs of children in the child protection proceedings. This background will also be useful in analyzing material in other courses in the degree program that focus on the legal process of child protection.

This course will focus on the fundamental concepts of family structure and interpersonal family dynamics that impact family functioning including communication and cultural diversity. Students will be introduced to the theoretical aspects of family systems functioning and investigate through practice the most effective application of theories introduced.

This course reviews child growth and development and individual differences in brain development, temperament and biology. Physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and language developmental sequences will be emphasized. Major theories of development will be reviewed.

This course will provide an overview of perspectives on placement and permanency, child protection trends, children in need, and the processes used to support children and their families while moving them through the system.

This course introduces students to various forms of family assessments and case planning. It introduces students to multiple and holistic family assessments and provides students with skills to increase their effectiveness and efficacy while providing services to their clients.

This course will provide a fundamental analysis of research and methodology as related to evaluation of agency and program administration. Included in this course will be an introduction to statistical analysis and the use of current technology.

Concentration (9 Credits)

Student must complete a minimum of 9 credits within their chosen concentration

(Offered through the Center for Psychological Studies)

HCP 6110 Intervention Strategies (3 credits)

This course is designed to give students a foundation in the issues involved in interpersonal communication, basic intervention strategies, and interviewing techniques in a multicultural world. Effective interviewing relies on knowledge of child development, mental health diagnoses, culture, family systems, and conflict resolution. Emphasis will be placed on learning strategies to effectively deal with difficult individuals and minimizing potential for conflict situations. Additional emphasis will be placed on cultural sensitivity. (Prerequisites required: HCP 6120 and HCP 6130)

HCP 6120 Overview: Childhood and Adolescent Development (3 credits)

This course covers how developmental maturation and social learning shapes personality in early childhood through the adolescent years. Theory and research in social and psychological development and learning are covered in topics such as attachment, aggression, sexuality, morality, cognitive development, self-regulation and self concept. This course will also focus on the developmental process as it relates to special populations.

HCP 6130 Overview: Childhood & Adolescent Psychological Disorders (3 credits)

Through the course readings, assignments and discussion boards, the students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the psychological disorders affecting children and adolescents and how these children with special needs are classified in the educational system. The objective of this course is to prepare students for assessing children and adolescents with the intent to understand how their needs will affect their ability to function in an academic setting.

HCP 6140 Overview: Children and Trauma (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of how to assist children who have been traumatized, and emphasis will be placed on understanding the developmental level of children and how that affects their behavior. This course will include information on building resilience in children.

HCP 6150 Special Topics: Seminar & Case Studies (3 credits)

This course focuses on building concepts and skills in critical thinking and application. It will offer students the opportunity to consider cases and explore varying intervention and management strategies with consideration for ethical and legal issues. Topics of interest include: addressing the current and emerging models of the Mental Health Delivery System and the core principles of system care approach, testifying in court, waiver of juveniles to adult court, differences in family and juvenile court protection of children, competency for Miranda and other issues for children, placement decisions, report writing, case management, reducing work stress/burn-out and enhancing professional functioning, legal rights of children in termination of their parent's rights, what are the best interests of a child' in domestic violence or sexual abuse cases, and other contemporary issues. (Prerequisites required: HCP 6110, HCP 6120 and HCP 6130)

HCP 6210 Theory of Child Protection, Investigation & Advocacy (3 credits)

This course will focus on the interpretation of social and systemic policies and procedures of child welfare agencies and nongovernmental agencies with emphasis on child advocacy, due process, and institutional standards. Emphasis will also be included regarding the remediation, intervention, rehabilitation, education, and other services designed to reduce recidivism amongst children and their families.

HCP 6220 Family Dynamics: Motivation, Support & Communities (3 credits)

This course will examine the protective and risk factors associated with the developmental pathways internalized by youth through interaction with their family system. Emphasis will be given to child and youth development as it is affected by the family system, peer groups, schools and teachers, community and other social influences. In addition, the dynamics of traditional, non-traditional and culturally diverse family construction in contemporary society will be explored. Basic cause of crimes and the various social issues confronting children and their families will be explored. Students will look at the various layers of services available for families and how they connect in reducing risk factors associated with the children.

HCP 6230 Victimology: Child Abuse & Exploited Children (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the field of victimology and explores its conceptual boundaries, basic concepts and literature. The course will be delimited by the exploration of the topics: family violence, child abuse including neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse and emotional and verbal abuse; and prevention, intervention and treatment issues associated with exploited children.

HCP 6240 Juvenile Justice: Systems, Structure & Process (3 credits)

Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the juvenile court as an institution and the policies and practices involved in processing children and youth through the juvenile justice system. The course introduces students to the juvenile justice system as it explores the history, development, and evolution/progress of the way juveniles have been treated by our country's criminal justice systems. This course will focus on the response of law enforcement in the protection of children in trouble or in need of services. The formal and informal processing of youth involved in the juvenile justice system or community based agencies will then be examined. Adapting an assessment instrument to ensure that all children are given due process protection, treatment, and delinquency prevention is reinforced.

HCP 6250 Substance Abuse Treatment in the Community (3 credits)

This course will examine various models of community-based programs for the individual who has a substance abuse disorder and is in the criminal justice system. It will focus on research regarding factors of recidivism, treatment matching, case management, relapse prevention techniques, setting treatment goals and resources in the community.

HCP 6260 Cultural Factors in Tx Associated w/ Substance Abuse Issues & the CJ System (3 credits)

This course will examine various models of community-based programs for the individual who has a substance abuse disorder and is in the criminal justice system. It will focus on research regarding factors of recidivism, treatment matching, case management, relapse prevention techniques, setting treatment goals and resources in the community.

(Offered through the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences)

HCP 6310 Human Factors (3 credits)

This course presents communication theories relevant to conflict resolution as well as theories about

understanding, analyzing, and managing conflict. The course focuses on the human and emotional

aspects of conflict, and includes the influence of gender and culture. This course is pragmatic as well as

theoretical, and presents communication and conflict resolution models in a practice-based approach.

HCP 6320 Introduction to Systems Theories (3 Credits)

This course provides and overview of theories that use metaphors of system, pattern, interaction, and communication to describe human behavior and relationships. Students will also study of the emergence of theories from cybernetics to language studies.

HCP 6330 Mediation Theory and Practice (3 Credits)

This course examines theories, methods, and techniques of mediation. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of mediation skills.

Prerequisite required: HCP 6310 (***THIS COURSE REQUIRES STUDENTS TO

PHYSICALLY ATTEND THE MAIN NSU CAMPUS TO ATTEND THE "Residential Institute"(RI)**)

HCP 6340 Diversity in Human and Family Development (3 Credits)

Reviews human development in the context of family transitions such as childbirth, childhood, adolescence, courtship, marriage, maturity, old age, and death. Focuses on the diversity of psychosocial development across ethnicity, class, gender, and culture. Discussion of implications for interactional therapies.

HCP 6350 Conflict and Crisis Management Theory and Practice (3 Credits)

This course is an overview of the theories of conflict and crisis management and the intervention models and protocols used. Conflict and crisis management will be explored among and between individuals and groups, organizations, communities, and governments around the globe. Topics will include the management of violent conflicts, such as kidnapping, hostage-barricade and terrorist acts, homeland security, and the response to natural disasters. There will be interactive exercises as well as a case study approach used.

HCP 6360 Critical Incidents (3 Credits)

This course will provide an in-depth analysis and understanding of inter-group and intra-group dynamics associated with the organizational response to critical incidents such as hostage/barricade management, terrorism, kidnapping, natural or other disasters, and tactical operations, which comprise the negotiations team, the government, organizations, and the community.

HCP 6370 Family Violence: The Effects on Families, Communities and Workplaces (3 Credits)

This course explores the overall effects of trauma and violence on individuals, families, communities, and the workplace. Issues of abuse, violence, and systemic responses are explored in relation to their effect on individual behavior, family dynamics, service provision, and community systems. Methods for identifying such issues in the context of family mediation and other types of conflict intervention are explored.

(Offered through the Shepard Broad Law Center)

HCP 6410 Family Law (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore the development of legal standards and protections that provide the legal framework of family law. The course will cover: the legal requirements for marriage and divorce; the distribution of marital property; custodial rights and visitation; the rights of unmarried persons and their children; child support and alimony; adoption. These topics will be covered through the study of statutory and case law.

Specific emphasis will be placed on the overlap of child custody and child protection proceedings.

HCP 6420 Children Rights Seminar (3 Credits)

Children have distinct rights recognizable at law even though they are considered to be incompetent minors as a matter of law. Even though their legal status is not equivalent to those of emancipated adults, children are entitled to specific legal protections in a variety of specific situations. To some extent they are entitled to similar constitutional protections of their adult counterparts. The course will also examine parental authority over minor children when there is disharmony between parent and child.

HCP 6430 Juvenile (including Delinquency) Law (3 Credits)

Juvenile law will explore the historical and legal background of juvenile law. This course will trace the development of juvenile law to the modern view of children's rights and legal recognition and enforcement they merit. The course will examine delinquent youth and the provision of services when the youth is also subject to child protection proceedings. The course will also examine status offenses and their role in shaping society's view of juvenile rights.

HCP 6440 Interviewing, Counseling and Negotiating (3 Credits)

This course will focus the theory and practice examining and developing skills involved in investigating facts, interviewing and counseling clients, settling disputes, negotiation conflict situations. Instructional techniques include readings, discussions, audiovisual presentations, and extensive participation in role-plays and simulations.

HCP 6450 Civil Rights of Children in State Care (3 Credits)

This course will provide the student with an introduction to Constitutional Law and federal legislation regulating the legal rights of children in state care. This field includes, among other subjects: (1) the constitutional/statutory rights of children in juvenile detention; (2) the constitutional/statutory rights of children in state protective custody, i.e., those children who have been adjudicated as state dependent. This second category includes, among other things, the rights of children: (a) while under state guardianship,(b) with respect to foster care and adoption resulting from an initial adjudication of dependency.

HCP 6460 Domestic Violence Seminar (3 Credits)

Domestic violence is a societal problem of epidemic proportions that affects families across America in all socioeconomic, racial and ethic groups. As information about the extent and impact of domestic violence emerges, it has been identified as a criminal justice issue, a public health crisis, and a costly drain on economic productivity. Domestic violence has a tremendous impact on the legal profession. Domestic violence and interpersonal family violence have direct connections to the child protection system and family court system as well. This course will explore those links from legal standpoint and explore the system protections designed to stop the violence.

HCP 6470 Legal Research and Methods Reasoning (3 Credits)

This course will focus on legal research methodology and the application of electronic research methods. Students will develop an understanding of legal precedents and the use of persuasive legal authority in the construction of legal arguments. Students will develop electronic research skill through hands-on application of appropriate legal research techniques. Students will be instructed on the use and importance of legal citations and how to identify legal authority based on citation methods as they explore statutory law and decisional case law.

(Offered through the Mailman Segal Institute)

HCP 6510: Principles of ABA (3 Credits)

This course will focus on the basic tenets of the science of applied behavior analysis that are the underpinnings of effective teaching strategies. Students will study the philosophy and science of applied behavior analysis, an overview of the areas of the field of ABA and its relation to education and psychology, basic vocabulary and concepts in the field, strategies for measuring behavior, basic strategies for increasing and decreasing behaviors of students, and ethical considerations in the application of ABA in a variety of settings. The course will emphasize educational applications in the classroom as well as in affecting systems change across organizations such as schools and district-wide services.

HCP 6520: Applications of ABA (3 Credits)

This course will extend the Basic Principles and Concepts course to include application of the principles of applied behavior analysis in educational and other therapeutic settings. It will focus on behavioral intervention strategies and change procedures, evaluation and assessment strategies, and methods of accountability in ABA interventions. In addition, focus will be placed on the ethical use of intervention strategies and making decisions regarding ethical treatment for individuals with a variety of challenges. The course will emphasize applications in applied behavior analysis in education as well as other areas of study.

(Prerequisite required: HCP 6510)

HCP 6530: Behavioral Models in Assessment and Intervention in ABA (3 Credits)

This course will focus on the variety of delivery models for services within the ABA model. Areas of focus will include the behavioral models of developmental disabilities, treatment of autism, organizational behavior management, school psychology, sports psychology, and education. Principles and research in each area will be addressed and participants will employ a variety of strategies from each area in the course assignments.

(Prerequisite required: HCP 6510)

HCP 6540: Evaluating Interventions in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 Credits)

This course will focus on evaluation strategies used in both research and in the ethical provision of interventions. It will cover a variety of measurement and assessment strategies for determining the effectiveness of interventions on a single-subject and small group design. Additional focus will be placed on the interpretation of the research literature to make sound decisions about assessment and intervention strategies for a variety of populations.

HCP 6550: Professional Issues in ABA (3 Credits)

This course will focus on issues of professionalism and ethics for the practice of applied behavior analysis in research and clinical settings. It will also address issues of working with systems to effect positive change in organizations and for individuals through consultation and collaboration with other professionals. Using applied behavior analysis to provide systems support and change and to enhance work as a consultant will be the underlying basis for the course.

(Prerequisite required: HCP 6510)

HCP 6560: Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I (3 Credits)

This introductory practicum is designed to meet the supervision requirements for the BCBA or BCABA certification. Students must participate at least 20 hours per week in a clinical experience that requires the application of ABA principles. Students will receive at least 2 hours of supervision weekly from their onsite supervisor. Students will be expected to collect and share data on their cases and employ strategies of behavioral assessment and intervention with input from their supervisor during the online sessions.

(Prerequisite required: HCP 6510)

HCP 6570: Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis II (3 Credits)

This practicum is the continuation of ABA 760 and designed to meet the supervision requirements for the BCBA or BCABA certification. Students must participate at least 25 hours per week in a clinical experience that requires the application of ABA principles. Students will receive at least 2 hours of supervision weekly from their onsite supervisor. Students will be expected to collect and share data on their cases and employ strategies of behavioral assessment and intervention with input from their supervisor during the online sessions.

(Prerequisite required: HCP 6510 and HCP 6560)

HCP 6580: Advanced Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 Credits)

This practicum is the continuation of ABA 770 and designed to meet the supervision requirements for the BCBA certification. Students must participate at least 25 hours per week in a clinical experience that requires the application of ABA principles. Students will receive at least 2 hours of supervision weekly from their onsite supervisor. Students will be expected to collect and share data on their cases and employ strategies of behavioral assessment and intervention with input from their supervisor during the online sessions.

(Prerequisite required: HCP 6510, HCP 6560, and HCP 6570)

(Offered through the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education)

HCP 6610 Survey of Exceptionalities of Children & Youth (3 Credits)

This course will provide students with fundamental information on laws, policies and practices in exceptional student education and on specific categories of exceptionality, including definitions, prevalence, causes, assessment techniques, educational strategies, and current and future trends in the field of exceptional student education.

HCP 6620 Inclusive Education for Exceptional Students (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the current information on how exceptional children are served within inclusive school environments. Students will learn about the role of working with other professionals and parents to determine student eligibility for special education, to carry out educational programs, and to monitor learning. Information will also be provided about students who are not necessarily eligible for special education, but who would benefit from the same instructional strategies as exceptional students because of their own special needs.

HCP 6630 Teaching Social & Personal Skills to Exceptional Students (3 Credits)

This course will present students with a wide range of information regarding the social and personal skills that children with disabilities need in order to achieve their personal independence in school, at home, and in the community. Emphasis will be on the importance of teaching personal management and independent living skills, on providing appropriate adaptations to promote personal autonomy, and on creating supports and services that maximize independence and community integration of students with disabilities.

HCP 6640 Consultation & Collaboration in Exceptional Student Education (3 Credits)

This course will help students become more proficient in working together within school contexts. Emphasis will be on the context of school and home collaborations, and on the diversity issues that may affect the way people work together. Students will learn that school consultation, collaboration, and teamwork are essential in transforming school learning environments into settings where teachers, administrators, and parents of exceptional students work together and trust each other for the benefit of the students.

HCP 6650 Special Education Law (3 Credits)

This course focuses on laws and policies that apply to the education of students with disabilities. The legal system, constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law, and the judicial decisions relating to the education of students with disabilities are reviewed. Students will examine the foundational concepts of equal protection, procedural and substantive due process in general and as they relate to special education specifically. Students will examine IDEA legislation and its six principles, The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). In addition, students will examine similar principles in state legislation with particular emphasis on school practices in special education.

(Offered through the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education)

HCP 6710 Family Systems (3 Credits)

This course provides a framework for understanding the dynamics of traditional, nontraditional, and culturally diverse families.

HCP 6720 Program Models (3 Credits)

This course represents a comprehensive overview of family support programs and identifies emerging trends and unresolved issues.

HCP 6730 Parent Support & Education (3 Credits)

This course examines the acquisition of knowledge and technical skills for practitioners working with families.

HCP 6740 The Profession in the Field of Family Support (3 Credits)

This course provides a historical review of the field of family support and a sociopolitical analysis of its status as an occupation and a human service.

HCP 6750 Public Policy in the Field of Family Support (3 Credits)

This course examines the policy-making process as it relates to children and families. It reviews current agencies and organizations involved in developing and implementing child and family policy programs. Social issues and principles of advocacy are covered.

HCP 6760 Assessment & Evaluation of Family Support Programs (3 Credits)

This course identifies dimensions of differences in families and family support systems and describes formative and summative evaluation systems that tap these dimensions.

(Offered through the Abraham S. Fischler School of Education)

HCP 6810 Supervision Methods & Approaches for Child & Youth Care Administrators (3 Credits)

This course provides a survey of specific approaches and aspects for the supervision of staff in programs for children and youths.

HCP 6820 Public Policy & the Child & Youth Care Field for Program Administrators (3 Credits)

This course examines the process and dynamics involved in the development of public policy as it relates to programs for children and youths.

HCP 6830 The Development & Acquisition of Resources for Child & Youth Care Program (3 Credits)

This course reviews a number of strategies for seeking and obtaining financial and non-financial resources for child and youth care programs.

HCP 6840 Supervision of Family Support Programs (3 Credits)

This course provides an orientation to a range of supervision issues, including staff motivation, in-service training, and evaluation of personnel.

HCP 6850 Legal Aspects of the Management of Programs for Children & Youths (3 Credits)

This course examines many of the legal elements involved in the daily management of programs for children and youths. Personnel law, licensing, child abuse, and liability are among the topics addressed.

HCP 6860 Financial Aspects of the Management of Programs for Children & Youths (3 Credits)

This course covers the basic components of financial management in programs for children and youths. The budget process, fiscal management, and policy determination will be covered.

(Offered through the College of Osteopathic Medicine)

Track Description: This track will expose students to public health issues such as wellness, preventative interventions, community health care, and general health impacts of abused and neglected children. Organizational and community interventions and resources will be investigated as it pertains to health education strategies and related topics such as health maintenance among various populations.

HCP 6910 Public Health Issues in Child Protection (3 Credits)

In this course students will learn to apply public health planning principles to the creation and refinement of programs to protect children from the negative health impacts of abuse and neglect. This includes both follow-up restorative programs for children already identified as abused/ neglected and community programs to prevent abuse/neglect before they occur. Since research knowledge in this field is expected to continue growing, students will become accustomed to adding to their personal knowledge base through critical study of new findings.

HCP 6920 Health Promotion & Disease Prevention (3 Credits)

Students learn health education strategies that can be incorporated into multiple settings, focusing on wellness and preventive interventions. This course addresses individual and social factors as well as behavioral issues, health detriments, and community resources.

HCP 6930 Health Services Planning & Evaluation (3 Credits)

An in-depth study of basic planning and evaluation techniques for the implementation of a community health care program. It addresses policy analysis techniques as well as the conceptual framework for the planning and management of health care programs. The course also reviews essential methods for effective planning and evaluation considering the economic, political, epidemiological, demographic, and other components that contribute to the assessment of health needs and resource allocation.

HCP 6940 Health Policy, Planning & Management (3 Credits)

Discusses principles and logic involved in health policy, planning, and management. Addresses history, political, and environmental contexts, and their incorporation into population research.

(Offered through the College of Osteopathic Medicine)

Track Description: This track will instruct the student on All-Hazards Preparedness at the local, state, and national levels. Topics such as education and training for all professionals, other health care workers, and executives to: prevent, protect, respond, prepare for, and recover from hazardous events emphasize vulnerable, hard-to-reach, and disadvantaged populations serve as a resource center in all-hazards preparedness perform research related to all-hazards preparedness will be examined.

HCP 6101 - All-Hazards Preparedness (3 Credits)

The course will define the interdisciplinary roles and responsibilities of interdisciplinary professionals, paraprofessionals, and volunteers in all-hazards emergency planning, response, mitigation, and recovery. In view of the constant changes in emergency preparedness this course is designed to provide knowledge, concepts and skills to equip law enforcement professional and other social and health related professions with a background in planning, preventing, protecting against, responding to and recovering from acts of bioterrorism and all-hazards events. Given the role of public health, education and social service professionals, and law enforcement in emergency preparedness, students will gain insights into effective communication with the health system, the community, and state and local agencies.

HCP 6102 - Communicable Diseases and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosive (CBRNE), Challenges for Vulnerable Populations (3 Credits)

This course will provide understanding of pandemic influenza, including the risk factors for first responders and the community at large with a special focus on vulnerable and hard to reach individuals. Special needs populations challenge emergency management issues involving healthcare and public safety in times of crisis. Support for those sheltering in place, homecare, as well as distribution of medicine and supplies will lessen the impact on the economy, and keeps society functioning. The course participants will learn the expectations of preparation and response to a pandemic and the support measures necessary to enforce prevention strategies defined by the community. The effects of CBRNE in the vulnerable groups, especially children, will be reviewed in depth. Prerequisite HCP 6101.

HCP 6103 - Legal Issues in Emergency Preparedness for Families and Individuals with Special Needs (3 Credits)

This course will identify 13 vulnerable and hard to reach populations and discuss how each of these groups is affected in times of disaster. Legal issues will be presented and discussed. Individuals with disabilities have always been aware of their special needs during emergencies; however Sept. 11th demonstrated a need for partnering within the community and emergency response efforts. This population segment requires first responders to act appropriately with creative problem solving. Special needs shelters provide a safe refuge for those who require health care supervision during the time of a disaster. These shelters require staffing and a secure setting before, during and after an event. County health departments assist local emergency management agencies to operate and maintain these efforts. Each of these situations has numerous legal issues that those involved in emergency preparedness need to be knowledgeable of. The course will be team taught.

Prerequisite HCP 6101.

HCP 6104 - Community Planning, Response, and Recovery for Families and Children (3 Credits)

The design of this course will address interdisciplinary roles in preparation and post disaster community health among families and children. Topics will include: best practice methods and evaluations the impact of the disaster on health and family, dissemination of health information, guides to family emergency planning, and avenues for public health and safety disciplines to interface with the health management organizations in place. Students will have an opportunity to interview families and assess their individual and family plans.

Prerequisite HCP 6101.

HCP 6105 - Special Topics in All-Hazards Preparedness for Vulnerable Populations (3 Credits)

This course is a capstone research and experience course for the student. Each student will select a topic of interest related to all-hazards preparedness for vulnerable populations research. In addition, students must take part in an approved community project at the volunteer or professional level in the all-hazards field.

Prerequisite HCP 6101.

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